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Axel Foster
Axel Foster

Buy Canon Camera



Choosing the best Canon camera isn't always easy. As the world's largest camera manufacturer, Canon makes cameras for every kind of photographer and offers several categories and price points, from affordable entry-level gear to premium professional products.




buy canon camera



Currently, the Canon EOS R5 is among the finest full-frame mirrorless models on the market right now, featuring superb autofocus, solid in-body image stabilization with a high-resolution sensor, and outstanding 8K video recording capabilities. However, if you're looking for the king of speed, then the Canon EOS R3 takes that crown. Both of these cameras are considered professional-grade cameras and therefore are featured within our best professional cameras, too.


If you are looking for the most affordable Canon camera, on the other hand, there's the Canon EOS R10. It's compact and versatile yet impressively affordable, representing excellent value for enthusiasts looking to shoot wildlife or action in particular.


Entry-level or expert, mirrorless or DSLR: our list below covers the best Canon cameras for every need, budget, and skill level. We even included the best deals or prices available so you can score some savings as well.


There's a heck of a lot to like about the Canon EOS R5, particularly if you're mainly a stills photographer. In fact, we'd say that there's never been a better Canon camera for those who shoot a wide range of photography.


It might have the headline-grabbing spec of 8K video, but the picture is a little less clear for videographers. The EOS R5's overheating restrictions are likely to put off those who mainly shoot lengthy clips (interviews, for example). We've tested the EOS R5's latest firmware, though, and didn't get any overheating warnings when shooting a short film in 32-degree temperatures, so it's certainly a very capable video camera for most people.


Canon clearly went all-out on the EOS R5, and it's close to being the perfect Canon camera for hybrid shooters. However, that comes at a cost. The EOS R5 has a high asking price, but if you're keen on the brand, then it may be worth paying.


It's now a few years old, but the Canon EOS RP continues to offer excellent value for those who want to go full-frame, but can't stretch the pricey Canon EOS R5 and EOS R6. We found it to be charmingly compact and easy to use during our tests, which means even beginners will be able to quickly find their way around the camera. However, the EOS RP's small size does occasionally make the camera feel front-heavy when using larger lenses.


We'd have liked to have seen a bigger upgrade on the EOS M50, as the Mark II still have a heavy 1.56x crop on 4K video. This crop goes up to 1.75x if you turn on digital image stabilization, which was too much for most shooting situations in our experience. But if you're happy to shoot 1080p video, this camera is well worth considering. We remain impressed with the performance of its 24.1MP APS-C CMOS sensor, with our tests revealing it to be very capable of producing high-quality images in a variety of situations. The camera also combines a vari-angle touchscreen and microphone input with a diddy, travel-friendly design.


Until recently, the EOS M6 Mark II was Canon's flagship APS-C camera, but that title now belongs the Canon EOS R7. The arrival of the latter pushes this model down our list, but it's still a great choice as a traveling companion and you do get the option of having no viewfinder, which further boosts its portability.


Its tiny body houses a 32.5MP APS-C sensor (the same one that's in the Canon EOS 90D listed below) and, working with a Digic 8 image processor, it offers up to 14fps continuous shooting. In our experience with the camera, this was great for sports, wildlife, street photography, and virtually any moving subject we pointed it at.


Just when most people assumed that DSLRs were dead, Canon decided to prove otherwise. The EOS 90D is almost certainly its last mid-range DSLR, but if you prefer the larger bodies and longer battery lives of those cameras, then it's a fine performer that's still well worth considering.


When it launched, the EOS 90D was the first camera of its kind to boast a 32.5MP sensor. Alongside its Digic 8 processor, this gives it the ability to capture 4K video at up to 30fps which is, thankfully is uncropped. While it's the same sensor and image engine pairing as the EOS M6 Mark II mentioned above, the EOS 90D doesn't quite have the speed of its mirrorless cousin, instead topping out at 11fps when shooting continuously in live view mode.


The battery has a CIPA rating of 1,300 shots, but our tests showed the camera is capable of well over that, which is way more than what you'd get from the average mirrorless camera. All in all, it's a wonderfully versatile snapper for anyone who prefers the DSLR experience.


Our tests found that the G5 X Mark II's ISO performance has been improved over previous iterations, while 4K video capture has also been added. For those who prefer a viewfinder to use the rear LCD screen, the pop-up EVF has a darn good resolution of 2.36-million dots. Despite packing in an EVF, Canon has even managed to add a flash to the camera. There's also an ND filter available on board if you happen to be shooting in brilliant sunlight.


We found the noise performance to be pretty good for a camera with a 1-inch sensor, although the 4K video quality isn't anything to write home about, particularly when compared to the likes of Sony's latest Cyber-shot RX100 range. Despite that, the G5 X Mark II is an excellent choice for a compact, provided you've got the spare change for it.


Buying a camera these days is a big investment, so every camera in this guide has been tested extensively by us so we can authoritatively decide on the best Canon camera. These days, real-world tests are the most revealing way to understand a camera's performance and character, so we focus heavily on those, along with standardized tests for factors like ISO performance.


To start with, we look at the camera's design, handling, and controls to get a sense of what kind of photographer it's aimed at and who would most enjoy shooting with it. When we take it out on a shoot, we'll use it both handheld and on a tripod to get a sense of where its strengths lie, and test its startup speed.


In various lighting conditions, we also test the camera's different autofocus modes (including Face and Eye AF) in a single point, area, and continuous modes. We also shoot a range of photos of different styles (portrait, landscape, low light, macro/close-up) in raw and JPEG to get a sense of metering and its sensor's ability to handle noise and resolve fine detail.


If the camera's raw files are supported by Adobe Camera Raw, we'll also process some test images to see how we can push areas like shadow recovery. And we'll also test its ISO performance across the whole range to get a sense of the levels we'd be happy to push the camera to.


Battery life is tested in a real-world fashion, as we use the camera over the course of the day with the screen set to the default settings. Once the battery has reached zero, we'll then count the number of shots to see how it compares to the camera's CIPA rating. Finally, we test the camera's video skills by shooting some test footage at different frame rates and resolutions, along with its companion app.


Mark is TechRadar's Senior news editor. Having worked in tech journalism for a ludicrous 17 years, Mark is now attempting to break the world record for the number of camera bags hoarded by one person. He was previously Cameras Editor at Trusted Reviews, Acting editor on Stuff.tv, as well as Features editor and Reviews editor on Stuff magazine. As a freelancer, he's contributed to titles including The Sunday Times, FourFourTwo and Arena. And in a former life, he also won The Daily Telegraph's Young Sportswriter of the Year. But that was before he discovered the strange joys of getting up at 4am for a photo shoot in London's Square Mile. ","contributorText":"With contributions from","contributors":["name":"Sharmishta Sarkar","role":"Managing Editor (APAC)","link":"href":"https:\/\/www.techradar.com\/author\/sharmishta-sarkar"]}; var triggerHydrate = function() window.sliceComponents.authorBio.hydrate(data, componentContainer); var triggerScriptLoadThenHydrate = function() if (window.sliceComponents.authorBio === undefined) var script = document.createElement('script'); script.src = ' -9-5/authorBio.js'; script.async = true; script.id = 'vanilla-slice-authorBio-component-script'; script.onload = () => window.sliceComponents.authorBio = authorBio; triggerHydrate(); ; document.head.append(script); else triggerHydrate(); if (window.lazyObserveElement) window.lazyObserveElement(componentContainer, triggerScriptLoadThenHydrate, 1500); else console.log('Could not lazy load slice JS for authorBio') } }).catch(err => console.log('Hydration Script has failed for authorBio Slice', err)); }).catch(err => console.log('Externals script failed to load', err));Mark WilsonSocial Links NavigationSenior news editorMark is TechRadar's Senior news editor. Having worked in tech journalism for a ludicrous 17 years, Mark is now attempting to break the world record for the number of camera bags hoarded by one person. He was previously Cameras Editor at Trusted Reviews, Acting editor on Stuff.tv, as well as Features editor and Reviews editor on Stuff magazine. As a freelancer, he's contributed to titles including The Sunday Times, FourFourTwo and Arena. And in a former life, he also won The Daily Telegraph's Young Sportswriter of the Year. But that was before he discovered the strange joys of getting up at 4am for a photo shoot in London's Square Mile.


The autofocus system is superb for an entry-level camera. It uses 45 phase-detection points. And they track your subject across the frame. You also have eye detection for humans and animals. So you can have fun shooting portraits and wildlife photography. 041b061a72


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